Tyers needs for April 6th 2019 Rendezvous!

The Guild will be holding its annual rendezvous April 6, 2019 at the CFFCM! If you are interested in tying with us please send us an email at catskillflytyersguild@gmail.com Lunch will be available for purchase and set up will start by 8 AM!

Reminder: February 16th presentation with Tony Ritter

Tony Ritter will be joining us Saturday February 16th at 1pm at the Wulff Gallery located in the Catskill Fly Fishing Center and Museum for a discussion on some of his great fish catching patterns and how they’ve evolved over the years.

Fly tyers needed for November shows!

The Catskill Fly Tyers Guild is looking for fly tyers to fill rotating spots at the next two shows!

“Arts of the Angler” will be November 4 and 5 at the Ethan Allen Inn, Danbury CT. Please contact Ed McQuat if you would like to tie. His email address is edmcquat@optonline.net or phone: 203-544-8014

We also need fly tyers for the International Fly Tying Symposium –

*NOTE THE NEW LOCATION* Marriott Hotel, Lancaster, PA – November 11 and 12, 2017 – contact John Kavanaugh if you are interested in tying, FlymanK@optonline.net or 973-219-7696

October 21st, 2017 – CFTG Meeting

The Catskill Fly Tyers Guild meeting will be held on October 21, at the Catskill Fly Fishing Center, Old Route 17, Livingston Manor NY at 1 pm.

Ed Ostapczuk will show a PowerPoint presentation on Ed Sens, based upon the five articles research he did that ran in the Gazette.

There will be no November meeting as we will be attending the Danbury show and the Lancaster PA show. The new hats will be available at the shows!

CJ’s flies mixing styles

I have grown to live with things as they are. I’m the type who doesn’t deviate from the standard. I used to mix it up a lot as a younger man, always tinkering with things to change them, most of the time with subpar results. My father told me, “They make it like that because it works.” When I took up fly tying, I went with my adult philosophy on the patterns I tie: read the dressing, tie the fly. No need to alter them much—maybe a different shade of hackle or body color, but for the most part, when you look at one of my flies, there is no argument as to what it is. In a nutshell, I guess that I am not a pattern designer.

However, I am happy that others are, and I never tire of reading about or seeing the “new” patterns that people think up and, better yet, use with success. Let’s face it, there are thousands of “new” patterns tied every year. Some are variations on a standard and some are totally different. And sometimes someone takes two standard patterns and morphs them together to make something different, yet familiar.

There’s still time to reserve your seat!

Our 4th annual dinner celebrating 24 years will be on September 16 at the Rockland House with Dave Brandt putting on a great Catskill program that you won’t want to miss! Silent auction and raffles! Donations are appreciated, contact me.
Entrees are prime rib $29, salmon $27 and chicken parmesan $27 inc gratuity, cash bar. Reservations must be made by Sept 9 to Judie at darbee1@juno.com or 607-498-6024. Send payment to CFTG Dinner, PO Box 663, Roscoe NY 12776.

Free fly tying courses with Guild member Hank Rope will begin February 18th, 2017

The Jerry Bartlett Angling Collection and the Phoenicia Fish and Game Club will sponsor a series of free fly-tying classes beginning on February 18, 2017 at 10:00 am.
The first class will be held at the Jerry Bartlett Angling Collection at the Phoenicia library, Main Street in Phoenicia on February 18.

The three additional classes, will be at Phoenicia Fish and Game on Route 28 in Mt. Tremper.

Preregistration is a must. Call or e-mail Hank Rope at: tyeflys@hvc.rr.com (845) 254-5904.

“Up on the Esopus”with Ed Ostapczuk – Bucktails: A Catskill Tradition

In Streamer Fly Tying and Fishing, Joseph D. Bates, Jr., perhaps the definitive authority on streamers and bucktails, defined the bucktail as “a fly possessing a predominately haired wing, whose shape and intended action are to represent a baitfish.” Bates went on to write: “A hair wing fly of this type is called a bucktail regardless of the kind of hair used.” This definition was given the stamp of approval by A. J. McClane in both McClane’s Standard Fishing Encyclopedia, his angling Bible, and The Practical Fly Fisherman. However, McClane did suggest that the name is derived from the use of hair from the tail of a deer for the wing. Regardless of the hair used to tie a bucktail, who can argue with this? Not me!

Bates also wrote that “the origin of both the streamer and the bucktail is lost in the dim history of the past.” But then he quickly adds, “It is certain that the American Indians used similar flies in the first half of the nineteenth century.” Further, he suggests that the origin of modern long-shanked flies can be traced back to the Catskills. In Streamer Fly Tying and Fishing, Bates devotes a fair amount of ink to the Bumblepuppy, which he notes was originally tied as a bucktail and streamer as early as 1880 by Theodore Gordon and later by Herm Christian, perhaps Gordon’s only fly-tying understudy.

CJ’s flies caddis flies the other trout food

“I never paid much attention to caddisflies in my fledgling years of fishing and tying flies. All my efforts were focused on mayflies, Art Flick’s Streamside Guide, and tying with wood duck flank feathers.

I was aware of caddises, even saw them often enough while fishing, but never considered them a viable source of trout food.

All this changed one afternoon when I was heading back to Pennsylvania after a morning in the Catskills opening up our summer house.

CJ’s Flies- “The Davidson Special”

“The Davidson Special” Photo, fly and article by “Catskill John” Bonasera “I have always loved flies with “Special” in their name. It seems they get that title from actually being special. During a meeting on-stream with an angler he didn’t know, Theodore Gordon plucked a mayfly from the nearby bushes, tied an imitation, and gave…