Free fly tying courses with Guild member Hank Rope will begin February 18th, 2017

The Jerry Bartlett Angling Collection and the Phoenicia Fish and Game Club will sponsor a series of free fly-tying classes beginning on February 18, 2017 at 10:00 am.
The first class will be held at the Jerry Bartlett Angling Collection at the Phoenicia library, Main Street in Phoenicia on February 18.

The three additional classes, will be at Phoenicia Fish and Game on Route 28 in Mt. Tremper.

Preregistration is a must. Call or e-mail Hank Rope at: tyeflys@hvc.rr.com (845) 254-5904.

Upcoming Event: February 18, 2017 Guild Meeting 

The February 18, 2017 monthly meeting of the Catskill Fly Tyers Guild will be held at the Catskill Fly Fishing Center, Old Route 17, Livingston Manor NY at 1 pm.   Last month we were tying flies for Casting For Recovery, our meeting place was not available due to weather – first time ever cancelled! If…

“Up on the Esopus”with Ed Ostapczuk – Bucktails: A Catskill Tradition

In Streamer Fly Tying and Fishing, Joseph D. Bates, Jr., perhaps the definitive authority on streamers and bucktails, defined the bucktail as “a fly possessing a predominately haired wing, whose shape and intended action are to represent a baitfish.” Bates went on to write: “A hair wing fly of this type is called a bucktail regardless of the kind of hair used.” This definition was given the stamp of approval by A. J. McClane in both McClane’s Standard Fishing Encyclopedia, his angling Bible, and The Practical Fly Fisherman. However, McClane did suggest that the name is derived from the use of hair from the tail of a deer for the wing. Regardless of the hair used to tie a bucktail, who can argue with this? Not me!

Bates also wrote that “the origin of both the streamer and the bucktail is lost in the dim history of the past.” But then he quickly adds, “It is certain that the American Indians used similar flies in the first half of the nineteenth century.” Further, he suggests that the origin of modern long-shanked flies can be traced back to the Catskills. In Streamer Fly Tying and Fishing, Bates devotes a fair amount of ink to the Bumblepuppy, which he notes was originally tied as a bucktail and streamer as early as 1880 by Theodore Gordon and later by Herm Christian, perhaps Gordon’s only fly-tying understudy.

“The Wet-Fly Corner”-Thunder

I am always searching for new wet-fly patterns. While looking through Bergman’s Trout, I came across a pattern that intrigued me from the start. When I first I saw this pattern, on plate 8 of Trout, I thought to myself, “What a wonderful pattern to bring to life in my vise, then give it a try a fishing!” When I looked at the actual pattern recipe and saw the materials listed and colors called for, though, I thought to myself, “Who in their right mind came up with this color scheme—and why?” The fly I am speaking of is called the Thunder.